Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Tours bring pioneer histories to life
by LOUISE R. SHAW
Aug 07, 2014 | 809 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
DEAN BECKER tells of the life of Anson Call and the women he rescued as part of the cemetery tours held to honor pioneers.  Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
DEAN BECKER tells of the life of Anson Call and the women he rescued as part of the cemetery tours held to honor pioneers. Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
slideshow

BOUNTIFUL — She was born on the trail after the rescue of the Martin Handcart company, and she is buried in the Bountiful Cemetery.

The history of Echo Squires Kirkham De Lee was told, along with stories of other handcart pioneers, at the recent cemetery tour following Bountiful Handcart Days.

Coni Sue Cutler shared the story of Echo, including how she was named for the canyon she was born in and how Brigham Young sent a special wagon to retrieve Echo and her mother after the delivery.

Echo’s life was not one of an ordinary pioneer. At 11, her family moved back to England where she attended private school. At 17, she chose to return to Utah, where she remained.

Stories of other handcart pioneers, around 30 of whom are buried at the Bountiful site, were told over two hours in shady locations spread throughout the cemetery.

Dean Becker told of Anson Call, a member of the rescue party, and how Call helped Margaretta Unwin Clark run around to get her circulation going, which saved her life. The two later married.

Julie Smith shared the story of Sarah Crossley Sessions, whose brother died along the trail and who never fully recoverd her strength.

Brady Cash told of the life of William Page, a Pony Express rider who later built a home at 500 South and 500 West in Bountiful, where he and his wife Mary Ann Clark raised 11 children.

Information on many of the pioneers buried in the cemetery is available at the cemetery, 2224 S. 200 West; and at the Bountiful museum, which is open Wednesdays from 2 to 4 pm. and Saturdays from 1 to 3 p.m., or by appointment at 801-296-2060. The museum is located at 845 S. Main.

Pamphlets run $5 each, and detail the lives of women pioneers, handcart pioneers and others subgroups. Special memorial plaques on headstones honor those who came to the valley as pioneers.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Postings are not edited and are the responsibility of the author. You agree not to post comments that are abusive, threatening or obscene. Postings may be removed at the discretion of davisclipper.com
Follow us on: