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Millburn wins; Ward takes narrow victory
by DAN METCALF, JR. and LOUISE R. SHAW
Jun 25, 2014 | 5701 views | 0 0 comments | 30 30 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bret Millburn and Ray Ward - courtesy photos
Bret Millburn and Ray Ward - courtesy photos
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Phil Wright, chairman of the Davis County Republican Party, visited with poll workers before casting his ballot at Bountiful’s South Branch Library. Poll workers said Tuesday’s turnout was higher than expected. Because of the mail-in ballot option and because it is a primary election, some had a smaller turnout at polls.  Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
Phil Wright, chairman of the Davis County Republican Party, visited with poll workers before casting his ballot at Bountiful’s South Branch Library. Poll workers said Tuesday’s turnout was higher than expected. Because of the mail-in ballot option and because it is a primary election, some had a smaller turnout at polls. Photo by Louise R. Shaw | Davis Clipper
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WOODS CROSS – Incumbent Republican Bret Millburn won Tuesday’s primary election over his challenger Brian Muir by a 56-44 percent margin in the race for Davis County Commission Seat A.

Millburn will face Democrat Steven J. Andersen this fall.

In the race for Bountiful’s District 19 Utah House of Representatives, Ray Ward held a 5-point lead over Chet Loftis (52.6 to 47.4 percent). With hand-delivered and late mail-in ballots yet to count, it’s mathematically possible for Loftis gain votes, but at press time it did not seem likely he would win. Ward’s lead represents only 253 votes.

By Wednesday morning the Utah GOP congratulated Ward as the winner in the District 19 primary race.

"I would like to congratulate all of our candidates who participated in Tuesday's primary elections," said Chairman James Evans. "All of our candidates worked very hard throughout the convention and primary season; and we appreciate their service to the Republican Party. I look forward to working with our nominees as we continue to grow our Party's strength throughout the state."

Ward will square off against Democrat Dan Donahoe in November. 

He issued the following statement early Wednesday morning: 

Campaigning is a lot of work, but it is also a lot of fun.  The folks of Bountiful are polite when you knock on their doors, and most of them have some issues that are important to them that they want to tell you about.  It is also a great feeling to see people support you as the campaign goes along. There are folks who I hadn't ever met before the campaign started, who have become good friends and have made phone calls and knocked on doors to help out.   This is a great hurdle to make it past, and I look forward to having the discussion again in the general election this fall.

I also know that Chet has been working very hard in this campaign for many months and I want to wish him and his family well.  

Davis County Republican Party Chairman Phil Wright told the Clipper he's pleased with any result.

"I'm happy with whomever won," he said. "All the primary candidates are strong, and we'll gladly back any of them."

In the race for the Davis School Board, the race came down to two candidates each for Districts 3 and 6.

The top two candidates in each District will go onto the November election.

In District 3, David Nelson garnered 44 percent and Julie Tanner came in second with 27.2 percent of the vote. Incumbent Peter Cannon was left on the outside with only 18.5 percent. Hiram Alba had 6.8 percent and Barbara White had 3.6, with 100 percent of precincts reporting.

In District 6, Mona Andrus (47.0 percent) and Thomas Waggoner (31.5 percent) will move on, while Michael Sperry (21.5 percent) was left out.

School board candidates run unaffiliated with any party.

The top two vote-getters will square off in the general election this fall.

Seat B of the commission race was won by a 60 percent-plus margin in the Republican Convention by Jim Smith, who will face a Democratic and Constitution Party candidate this fall.

The same holds true for many of the House and State Senate races, as well as federal races for House of Representatives, Districts 1 and 2.

For the first time, ballots were mailed to county residents, who could then return them by mail, carry them into polling places on the day of the primary or as in the past, vote at primary locations the day of the election.

Only seven polling places were open because of the mail-in option, where normally 50 to 70 are up and running throughout the community, according to Brian McKenzie, county election director.

Poll workers said they were impressed at the number voting or returning ballots.

“We had a fairly good turnout,” said McKenzie, “especially when you consider the dynamics of the election.”

On the day of the election, over 24,000 ballots had been returned by mail, 1,900 of them coming in on June 24. McKenzie anticipated a total of 25,000 ballots cast.

Ballots received by mail were counted as they came in, and as soon as polls closed at 8 p.m., the numbers were posted. Ballots cast electronically were counted as soon as poll workers could drive to election headquarters in Farmington. Mail-in ballots physically delivered to polling stations will be opened, signatures confirmed, and ballots counted after the 24th.

By mail ballots must have been postmarked by midnight, Monday June 23 to be eligible for inclusion in the election count.

County officials emphasized that the primary election results would not be official until after a canvass has been completed by July 8. 

Stay with the Clipper for updates on all county races in the primary election.

 

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