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Bomb scares keep county on edge
Apr 25, 2013 | 651 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security advises people to use their common sense if they see something suspicious.
On its website, the department advises:
• Trust your instincts; if something feels 		wrong, don’t ignore it
• Do not assume that someone else 		has already reported it
• Call local authorities
• Keep your distance from a suspicious 		package—do not approach or tamper with 		it
The website goes on to say:
“When you make a report, be ready to provide your name, your location, a description of what you think is suspicious, and the time you saw it. The responding officer will assess the situation, ensure the area is evacuated and call for appropriate personnel and equipment.”
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security advises people to use their common sense if they see something suspicious. On its website, the department advises: • Trust your instincts; if something feels wrong, don’t ignore it • Do not assume that someone else has already reported it • Call local authorities • Keep your distance from a suspicious package—do not approach or tamper with it The website goes on to say: “When you make a report, be ready to provide your name, your location, a description of what you think is suspicious, and the time you saw it. The responding officer will assess the situation, ensure the area is evacuated and call for appropriate personnel and equipment.”
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Mountain View Elementary, Northridge High and Davis Hospital see lockdowns

BY MELINDA WILLIAMS

Clipper Staff Writer

LAYTON —  Three incidents related to bombs in one day have Layton and Davis County residents concerned that copycat bombers are targeting area institutions.

However, Layton police don’t believe the incidents are in anyway related to the Boston Marathon bombings or are copycats.

Layton Police Lt. Shawn Horton on Wednesday said the department has no leads yet in its investigation of who may have placed an exposive device on the roof of Mountain View Elementary School on Monday, or when the device was put there.

Police are reviewing about two weeks of surveillance video from 14 cameras to get any clues regarding the incident. Police have hundreds of hours of video to examine.

“We want to make sure we go through everything,” he said.

More than 700 kids and 70 staff members were evacuated from the school at 2025 E. 3100 North in Layton at about 11:30 a.m. Monday after the explosive device was found on the roof of the school by a maintenance worker.

Bomb technicians from the Davis County Sheriff’s Office used high pressure water to detonate the device, described as a piece of PCV pipe containing rifle gunpowder, Horton said. It had no visible fuse. 

Police don’t believe the device was placed on the roof by someone at the school, but was likely thrown there. It was light and could have easily been thrown, Horton said.

The device wouldn’t have done much damage to the school if it had gone off, but if someone had been holding it when it went off it could have caused severe injury, maybe death, the lieutenant said.

Students and staff were evacuated to a nearby church and parents were alerted to pick up their students there. Horton complimented the school for the smooth evacuation.

As the bomb squad was finishing at Mountain View Elementary, police received a call of a suspicious backpack at Northridge High School. Bomb squad members X-rayed the bag and found it contained only school supplies and some clothing. Shortly after, a student identified the backpack as his.

“It looks like the student just left the backpack in the hall,” Horton said. “We don’t believe there was any intent to hurt anyone.”

However, he said since 9-11, leaving such an item unattended “looks a lot different now than it used to.”

Then, Monday evening Davis Hospital and Medical Center was placed on lockdown for about two hours after a call came in on a private line about 7:19 p.m. 

A female caller said, “This is for real. I’m going to blow up the hospital,” Horton reported.

During the lockdown no one was allowed into the hospital except through the emergency door, where a security guard and police officer searched those who entered.

Police searched inside and outside the hospital and found no evidence of a bomb.

mwilliams@davisclipper.com

 

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