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Brett Knight, 33, named as man killed after I-15 chase
Feb 26, 2013 | 3470 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This Bearcat armored car was used to stop the fleeing truck of Brett Max Knight, who led police on a high-speed chase on Monday through three counties. The resulting shootout closed northbound I-15 near the Kaysville/Layton border for several hours.
Photo courtesy of the Davis County Sheriff's Department
This Bearcat armored car was used to stop the fleeing truck of Brett Max Knight, who led police on a high-speed chase on Monday through three counties. The resulting shootout closed northbound I-15 near the Kaysville/Layton border for several hours. Photo courtesy of the Davis County Sheriff's Department
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KAYSVILLE — The Utah Department of Public Safety has identified the suspect killed by officers on I-15 following a high-speed chase Monday as Brett Max Knight, 33.

He had lived in Utah County, but officers didn’t know where he had been saying before he was shot and killed Monday evening.

Four officers fired at Knight. Three were Utah County Sheriff’s deputies and one was a Davis County deputy, according to Utah Highway Patrol Lt. Dwayne Baird.

The Davis County officer has been placed on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation, said Davis County Sheriff’s Sgt. Susan Poulsen. She did not reveal the officer’s name or provide other details.

The rush-hour chase started in Lehi after two Draper City police went to the city looking for Knight, Baird said.

 They wanted to question him in regard to a burglary that occurred Friday, Feb. 22 at a Chase Bank at 223 E. 12300 South in Draper. 

The Draper officers joined Lehi officers and went looking for Knight a local motel at about 4 p.m. Monday. The suspect saw them coming, jumped into his truck and sped northbound on I-15 through Salt Lake County and into Davis County.

Speeds reached 110 mph, some news agencies reported, but slowed to between 20 and 35 mph after the Davis County line.

In Salt Lake County near 4500 South, officers spiked the truck and flattened both of its left tires, but the truck continued on. By the county line, the suspect was driving on sparking rims.

Officers feared that it could burst into flames, so asked firefighters to join them on the scene.

Meanwhile, officers performed what they called a “slow down” behind the chase to keep regular traffic from encroaching on the chase, according to a press release.

During the chase, police told one another the suspect had a gun and that he had threatened police before over their radios, but the highway patrol was unable to confirm those reports Monday evening.

Near the Kaysville/Layton border, officers with the Davis County Sheriff’s SWAT team stopped the truck using a Bearcat armored vehicle. They did a pit maneuver, which caused the truck to spin and stop, Baird said.

Sheriff’s Capt. Arnold Butcher was the driver.

Once the car was stopped, Knight got out of his car, holding the pistol behind his leg. Police yelled at him to drop it.

“The suspect made motion in a threatening manner and responding officers fired on the suspect,” Baird said. “He was wounded.”

Ambulances and an emergency helicopter were on the scene almost immediately and first responders tried to save the man’s life for several minutes, Baird said, but he was pronounced dead at the scene.

The freeway remained closed between Park Lane in Farmington and Hill Field Road until about 11:15 p.m.

“They performed outstanding,” Davis County Sheriff Todd Richardson said on Tuesday morning. We’re just happy the way that everybody worked together. We like to see it when our training starts kicking in.”

While cars were parked on the freeway for several miles, another major accident occurred in Centerville when a woman failed to stop in time and rammed into the back of a tractor-trailer. She died.

The Utah Bureau of Investigation will conduct an investigation into the shooting.

Such investigations are sometimes wrapped up in a matter of days, but others can take several weeks, Baird said.

Clipper reporters Rebecca Palmer and Melinda Williams contributed to this article.

rpalmer@davisclipper.com
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