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America, we’ll get over the Twinkie
Nov 22, 2012 | 1815 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
BRYAN GRAY
BRYAN GRAY
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The opinions stated in this article are solely those of the author and not of The Davis Clipper.

 

My analysis of the recent election returns must wait because this week the hot topic at the office water cooler is the demise of the Twinkie.

Yes, some of you may think Mitt Romney could have saved our nation from socialist peril, but he couldn’t have done anything about saving the Twinkies and the Ding Dongs, both of which were hanging by a slender thread, which the labor unions cut.

And then came the hue and cry and weeping and wailing and gnashing of teeth. One shopper said it was the worst day of her life; another said she wanted to sit down and cry. One of my office counterparts told me this was the evil work of the labor unions destroying an iconic American institution.

I guess I’m not one of the anguished crowds. I haven’t eaten a Twinkie in 20 years, and the mystery of the Hostess Snowball is lost upon me.

The Twinkie is a cheap bakery item that New York City could potentially outlaw as unhealthy. It’s not iconic; I didn’t see a single Twinkie last week as I walked the halls of the Smithsonian. The only place a Ding Dong has in a museum is the sound of the loading dock doorbell.

I can grieve the loss of jobs, but hardly the death of a bakery product. The loss of Wonder Bread will not be the end of sandwiches. If the country got over the extinction of Tab, I’m sure it can function without Ho-Hos. Hostess had no place in the Weight Watcher’s Hall of Fame.

But let’s say I’m wrong. If the Twinkie were a major component of America’s fabric, maybe we should analyze its death and the role played by labor unions.

Hostess has been in bad shape for decades. This was its second bankruptcy, and the workers had previously accepted cuts in salaries and benefits. While the refusal by the unions to accept more cuts was the final blow, Hostess wasn’t known as a well-managed company, and the workers pointed to its CEO’s extravagant pay as an example.

For more information check out the Nov.22 edition of Davis Clipper. 

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