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Apr 19, 2013 | 563 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Elizabeth Holvey’s “Negotiated.” is  currently on display on the second floor of the Davis County Memorial Courthouse.  
Photo by Jenniffer Wardell | Davis Clipper
Elizabeth Holvey’s “Negotiated.” is currently on display on the second floor of the Davis County Memorial Courthouse. Photo by Jenniffer Wardell | Davis Clipper
slideshow

Students explore sculptural possibilities in BDAC exhibit

BY JENNIFFER WARDELL

Clipper Staff Writer

FARMINGTON — With enough imagination, 3D art can seem almost alive. 

There’s plenty of that imagination on display at the Bountiful/Davis Art Center’s 2013 Davis District High School Student and Educators Exhibit, running now through May 3 at the Farmington location. The exhibit includes a mix of 2D and 3D work, but it’s the creativity and personality of the vases, masks and sculptures that shine the brightest. 

Several of the pieces are teapots or vases, useful items that also hint at a fantastical story. In Lindsay Pearce’s “Desert Memories,” the arms of the cactus seem as if they’re reaching up to enfold the viewer. Allyse Craig’s “Aspirations of a Giraffe” transforms the animal into a cleverly shaped teapot brimming with personality. 

Some pieces hint at other worlds. Elizabeth Holvey’s “Sleeping Czori” is an elegant close-up look at a beautiful, mysterious alien. Down another hallway, Kylie Wilson’s “Faces of Wisdom” sees human spirits in what could either be a tree or a rushing windstorm. 

Wind also serves as the inspiration for Raul Cruz’s “Night Wind.” Sinuous curves twist from a slender top down to a much wider curve, as if someone had released a windstorm and finally allowed it to fly free. 

The most delightful 3D piece in the exhibit is at once the most simple and most complicated. Elizabeth Holvey’s “Negotiated” is displayed so that viewers first approach it from the side, where it looks like nothing more than random items held together by a curve of wire netting. A closer look will reveal that some of the items are book spines and coat hangers, but nothing more than that. 

Move around to the front of the piece, however, and a human figure suddenly emerges like an optical illusion. 

 

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