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Off-Highway vehicle decision could buck riders
Jul 07, 2013 | 1194 views | 0 0 comments | 30 30 recommendations | email to a friend | print
OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLES being used on public land was the topic of discussion at the Salt Lake City courtroom Tuesday. Proposals are being put in place that could allow for a lot of land to be used for OHV’s.
File Photo
OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLES being used on public land was the topic of discussion at the Salt Lake City courtroom Tuesday. Proposals are being put in place that could allow for a lot of land to be used for OHV’s. File Photo
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BY SHAIN GILLET

Clipper Sports Editor

 

SALT LAKE CITY – Many locals from Davis County and elsewhere have enjoyed being able to ride off-highway vehicles over the hot summer months.

However, being able to use them on public land was an issue raised on Tuesday in a Salt Lake City courtroom.

That day, the Bureau of Land Management’s fist of six Resource Management plans was presented and was expected to come under fire by conservation groups in Utah.

A five-year battle that started in 2008, the conservation groups have challenged the Richfield Resource Management Plan for south central Utah.

The Richfield Management Plan was the first option presented Tuesday. Information given to the Clipper via email said the Richfield Field Office is responsible for some 2.1 million acres of public lands in south-central Utah.

The Richfield Field Office resource management plan was completed recently, and includes and additional 1.5 million-plus acres of Federal mineral estate that will be administered by BLM and Sanpete, Sevier Piute, Wayne and Garfield Counties.

Attorney Steve Bloch of the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance said the plan puts too much emphasis on off-roading and oil and gas development in areas that deserve greater protection.

The BLM’s proposal, posted online at blm.gov, listed the resource management plan with five alternatives built in. In Tuesday’s courtroom proceedings, it was expected that one OHV designation be presented and proposed as part of the management plan.

The plan called for limited or designated roads and trails for OHV’s in the southeast portion of Wayne County, and shows an open travel area that is very small portion of the county.

In each of the other four “alternative” proposals, the open cross country section for OHV’s is wider. Other alternatives have no open cross country travel and closes much of the county to OHV’s. 

Reactions or any votes on the proposed management plan were not available at press time.

More information can be seen at blm.gov/ut/st/en/fo/richfield/planning/rmp.

sgillet@davisclipper.com

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